Jessica S. C. Ng, PhD Candidate

Welcome! I’m a PhD candidate in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

 

 
 
 
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About Me

I’m a born-and-bred Canadian from the Toronto ‘burbs with a love for gin, Sichuan food, cheesy blockbuster action movies, country music, and the Detroit Red Wings.

I graduated from the University of Toronto in 2014 with an honours bachelors degree in Canadian Studies, Sexual Diversity Studies, and English Literature, where I developed a love for social science research and specifically on LGBT- and HIV-related topics. On a chance grad school application (partly to work with the scholar who would later become one of my PhD supervisors), I wound up obtaining my masters degree in 2015 in Social Policy and Development (NGOs) at the London School of Economics (LSE) with a dissertation hypothesising the effects of Christian international NGOs on the space for LGBT NGOs and activism in China. Lingering questions from my masters degree around how LGBT NGOs survive after achieving their goals, and the unintended effects of progressive social policies, have shaped my current research interests and formed the basis of my doctoral research in Social Policy at the LSE.

PhD Dissertation

What are the unintended consequences of socially progressive policies? And what happens when organisations get what they want (i.e. ‘success’)? In this dissertation, I explore these questions by examining a timely case: the implications of long-term same-sex marriage legalisation for LGBT nongovernmental organisations in Canada. A landmark shift in citizenship and the everyday lives of LGBT people, same-sex marriage legalisation constitutes a social and political shift to the context in which LGBT advocacy groups operate—but as service provider organisations and their funders are also part of this policy arena/ecosystem, we might expect these organisations to also be affected in some way.

To understand this puzzle, I conducted and qualitatively analysed semi-structured in-depth interviews with high-level members of LGBT advocacy groups, service providers, and their funders. I compare NGO ‘survival’—and the sector-specific and wider implications of organisational survival and survival strategies—long after same-sex marriage policy ‘success’ in three different political, economic, and sociocultural environments: Calgary, Toronto, and Montreal.

Drawing upon management literature, organisational theory, and NGO and third sector theory, this dissertation contributes to pressing debates in LGBT politics, as well as the third sector vis-a-vis NGO roles in policy and governance. More broadly, using the LGBT case my dissertation contributes to ongoing debates in social policy and organisation studies.

Supervisors

Dr. Timothy Hildebrandt

Professor David Lewis

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Publications & Current Research Projects

Using an interdisciplinary approach, my research broadly examines how social policies affect sexual minorities in unintended and disproportionate ways; taking a critical approach, and often using organisational analysis, I highlight their wider sociopolitical implications for sexualities, (in)equalities, public health, civil society, and governance.

 
 

The effect of ‘lifestyle stigma’ on public support for NHS-provisioned pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and preventative interventions for HPV and type 2 diabetes: A nationwide UK survey. BMJ Open, 2019(9), e029747. (open access)

Tim Hildebrandt, Leticia Bode, & Jessica S. C. Ng

 

Responsibilization and sexual stigma under austerity: Surveying public support for government-funded PrEP in England. Under Peer Review.

Tim Hildebrandt, Leticia Bode, & Jessica S. C. Ng

 
The Harbourfront, Toronto

The Harbourfront, Toronto

Understanding the long-term persistence of ‘short-term’ health crisis NGOs: The case of Toronto’s minority ethnospecific HIV/AIDS service organisations. Working Paper.

Winner of the 2019 Social Policy Association Award for Excellence in Doctoral Research.

 
Old Montreal

Old Montreal

Nation-building through LGBT civil society organisations: The state pursuit of LGBT social equality in the post-same-sex marriage era—The case of Quebec. Working Paper.

Presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association in Washington, DC.

 

Public Impact & Outreach

 
 
Title:  Without oil drilling… many LGBT NGOs in Canada wouldn’t survive.

Title: Without oil drilling… many LGBT NGOs in Canada wouldn’t survive.

Dissertation research and co-authored PrEP research featured (in visual form) at the gallery@oxo on London’s Southbank, in ‘How Social Policy Shapes the World You Live In’ Exhibition (Jan. 10-20, 2019)

Title:  Where in England is PrEP?

Title: Where in England is PrEP?

In partnership with London’s gallery@oxo, the LSE Social Policy Department held a gallery exhibition in January 2019 showcasing faculty and doctoral research at work in public life. Naturally, in the style of a billboard ad with an artistic twist, I rendered my dissertation research and my co-authored PrEP research (adjacent and above) into visually-appealing conversation-starting slogans that would communicate the gist of our research to passersby and entice them to come into the gallery to learn more on the accompanying plaque.

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Op-Ed in The Guardian

“No more excuses: the NHS must fund the drug that stops people getting HIV” (Sept. 27, 2018)

Read the op-ed featuring my co-authored PrEP research here. Author credit: Tim Hildebrandt.

 
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Invited opening speaker at the 2018 LGBT+ Philanthropy Summit (Toronto)

While finishing up my doctoral fieldwork, I was invited by the LGBT+ Giving Network in Toronto to provide a preliminary look at my findings on the state of the city’s LGBT nonprofit sector. I was absolutely humbled to deliver the opening plenary talk entitled, “Success and survival: Funding-related research on the Canadian LGBT nonprofit sector.”

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Teaching an LPS-SA301 seminar at the LSE-PKU Summer School in Beijing.

Teaching an LPS-SA301 seminar at the LSE-PKU Summer School in Beijing.

Teaching Philosophy

I am very passionate about teaching, which is an important part of what I do. I aim to foster interdisciplinary learning, highlighting the analytical utility of drawing upon multiple theoretical and conceptual perspectives. I employ a global comparative perspective, drawing upon empirical examples from the Global North and Global South to emphasize similarities in social, political, and economic phenomena across contexts. I aim to get students to put theory into practice by encouraging them to bring their own experiences to interpret what they learn, and including applied activities in my teaching. I also draw upon my research expertise and findings to enrich the curriculum and provide a glimpse into the real-world impact of scholarly research.

 

Teaching Experience

 
 
Church-Wellesley Village, Toronto

Church-Wellesley Village, Toronto

SA4K2 (now SP417): Sexuality, Everyday Lives, and Social Policy in Developing Countries (masters level)

Guest Lecturer, Course Marker (Spring Term 2019)

Instructor: Dr. Timothy Hildebrandt

SP331: Sexuality, Everyday Lives, and Social Policy in Developing Countries (undergraduate level)

Guest Lecturer (Spring Term 2019), Graduate Teaching Assistant (Spring Terms 2019, 2020)

Instructors: Dr. Timothy Hildebrandt, Dr. Hakan Seckinelgin


LPS-PP201: Policy Innovation in Contemporary China: From ‘Big Society’ to Social Credit Scores

Course Design & Curriculum Development, Graduate Teaching Assistant (Summer Term 2019)

Instructor: Dr. Timothy Hildebrandt

LSE-Peking University Summer School (in Beijing)

Peking University, Beijing

Peking University, Beijing


Austin, Texas

Austin, Texas

SA201: Research Methods for Social Policy

Graduate Teaching Assistant (Fall Term 2018)

Instructors: Dr. Amanda Sheely, Dr. Hayley Jones


LPS-SA301: From NGOs to Social Enterprises: Chinese Social Organisations in Local and Global Governance

Graduate Teaching Assistant (Summer Terms 2015, 2016, & 2018)

Instructor: Dr. Timothy Hildebrandt

LSE-Peking University Summer School (in Beijing)

Peking University, Beijing

Peking University, Beijing

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Student Feedback

I feel like Tim [and Jess] really designed the course very well... the integration between lectures and seminars are well done... Jess moderates the class discussions and gets everyone to contribute something to the larger conversation. We glean so much from it as it means that we are forced to engage with the knowledge while bringing our unique experiences and perspectives.
— Business Professional, LPS-PP201 (Policy Innovation in Contemporary China)
Jess creates a number of resources for us to use every class which is really helpful. She also makes the content very accessible and is willing to go over concepts until you understand them!
— Undergraduate Student, SA201 (Research Methods for Social Policy)
Jess is an amazing teacher... her classes are always a positive experience.
— Undergraduate Student, SA201 (Research Methods for Social Policy)
The breadth and depth of work covered by both Professor Hildebrandt and our tremendously talented TA, Jess, was astounding given the compressed time frame... the ability of both Professor Hildebrandt and Jess to convey complex theories to a class with varying levels of knowledge about the topic and associated literature was remarkable.
— Graduate Student, LPS-SA301 (From NGOs to Social Enterprises)
 

Curriculum Vitae

For all of my research and teaching, have a look at my frequently-updated CV.

 
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 Contact

If you’d like to get in touch, drop me an email at the address below. I can also be found on ResearchGate, LinkedIn, and on the LSE Social Policy website.

j.ng10(at)lse(dot)ac(dot)uk